1. Patients Get 11 Seconds!

    On average, patients have 11 seconds to explain the reasons for their visit before their physicians interrupt them. Researchers at the University of Florida in Gainesville analyzed the first few minutes of tape recorded consultations between 112 patients and their physicians in various U.S. clinics. In 36 percent of the visits, patients were able to outline the reasons for their visits first. How…Read More

  2. Walk Every Day to Extend Your Life

    If post-menopausal women walk at an average pace for at least 40 minutes several times per week, their risk of heart disease will drop nearly 25%, according to new research from Brown University.   Their analysis shows walking is almost equal to all different types of exercise that have been studied in terms of lowering heart disease.   Heart failure rates rise with age. Women 75-84 year…Read More

  3. To Attract New Hires, Create Volunteer Opportunities

    The unemployment rate in the U.S. is at a 17-year low, which is good news for American workers. Companies that want to add high-quality employees to their ranks are finding it hard to attract new talent. Offering a competitive salary and generous bonus programs are not enough. Candidates want time away from work to volunteer in the community. Doing so boosts employee morale and helps create a posi…Read More

  4. Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation with SelfCare for HealthCare

    Nurses work tirelessly to meet patients’ needs, but for many, this comes at the cost of their own health. Nurses are more likely to be overweight, have higher levels of stress and get less sleep than the average American, according to the American Nurses Association (ANA) Health Risk Appraisal. They are at risk for burnout, illness, injury and musculoskeletal pain. They make up the largest subs…Read More

  5. Women Getting Less Sleep than Men

    A new survey from the Better Sleep Council found that males often bragged about getting adequate amounts of sleep, while the women were considerably less likely to get a good night’s rest. Eight-four-percent of female participants found that sleep is important to their health, however, compared to men, the women fell short of getting recommended amounts of sleep each night. Researchers found th…Read More

  6. How to Produce More Nurses Faster

    There is tremendous demand from students who want to enter nursing programs, yet last year 56,000 qualified applicants were turned away. So nursing programs are thinking out of the box, creating ways to accommodate more students.   West Virginia University's School of Nursing is expanding their program to new campuses, looking at new models of partnering with hospitals to allow their nursing …Read More

  7. 56,000 Qualified Applicants Turned Away from Nursing Schools

    There's an acute nursing shortage in the United States. Experienced nurses are retiring at a rapid clip, and there aren't enough new nursing graduates to replenish the workforce, yet nursing schools are turning away thousands of qualified applicants.   There are currently about three million nurses in the United States. The country will need to produce more than one million new registered nur…Read More

  8. Poor Sleep Causing Health Problems

    Poor sleep quality and insomnia are associated with increased blood pressure and vascular inflammation in women, according to a study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. A large minority, about 28%, of Americans report less than six hours of sleep a night. Another 24% face an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Women experience sleep disturbances largely due to fulfilling dem…Read More

  9. Working Overtime May be Bad for Your Health

    Working lots of overtime may be bad for you. New research suggests that women who clock 45 or more hours a week have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than those who work 35 to 40 hours weekly. The researchers aren't sure why extra work may boost diabetes risk, or why this link was only found in women, but they suspect it is related to the hours of unpaid work at home that women tend to engage in m…Read More

  10. Another Reason for Adequate Sleep: Safer Pregnancies

    Sleep is an emerging risk factor for various prenatal complications. Sleep, its duration and quality, may affect the baby. Research is showing that sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, may restrict oxygen flow to the baby and cause cardiovascular problems for the mother later in life. Low birth weight, which is defined as less than 5.5 pounds, is associated with adverse health outcome…Read More