1. Save Money: Exercise

    Staying fit not only adds years to your life, but dollars to your wallet, says a new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Researchers reviewed data from a survey of some 26,000 Americans over the age of 18 and found that people who said they met the recommended criteria …Read More

  2. High Stress: Poor Health Behaviors

    Research proves that high levels of stress lead to negative health behaviors among healthcare professionals. Researchers measured stress and health behaviors, such as exercise, nutrition, and sleep, by examining the results of series of five annual surveys administered to employees at Mayo Clinic wh…Read More

  3. Increased Employee Well-Being Increases Engagement

    Employee well-being and engagement are different, but related. Engagement is the strength of the emotional connection employees have with their work, team, company, and higher purpose. Well-being is defined as a state of optimal health, happiness, and purpose. Research shows that when employees feel…Read More

  4. Get a “Gym Buddy” to Increase Exercise

    A new exercise buddy may give you that extra motivation to keep going, according to a new study from the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. For the study, the researchers asked half of the participants to find a new gym buddy and told the other half to continue with their normal exercise routine. T…Read More

  5. Lost Sleep Is Detrimental to Your Health

    New research suggests a link between lost sleep and an increase in risk factors for heart disease and stroke as it correlates with a higher risk of plaque buildup in blood vessels and a thickening of artery walls. The University of Pittsburgh studied sleep problems common during menopause. They asse…Read More

  6. 70% of Workforce Lacks Work-Life Balance

    70 percent of the American workforce struggles to find a work-life balance, which could have negative health impacts over the long run. Employers are increasingly concerned with employee health, as studies continue to show the direct cost it can have. For example, Duke University researchers found t…Read More

  7. My Job Is Killing Me!

    People sometimes complain that their job is killing them, or that they’re working themselves to death, but new research suggests there may be truth to those clichés. A recent study conducted by Indiana University found that those who work in high-stress jobs with little control are more likely to…Read More

  8. Happy, Healthy Workers Reduce Turnover

    Research shows that happy, healthy workers experience less turnover and are more productive - the same is true of worker retention in the nursing field. Rising healthcare costs provide additional incentives for workplace health programs designed to improve employees’ physical health. Now researche…Read More

  9. Take an “Unsick” Day

    Many healthcare workers feel guilty for taking time off. In fact, 60 percent of employed Americans said they feel uncomfortable taking a day off work for preventive care and 86 percent would forego checkups and put work first. Some employers offer “Unsick Days” to give staff paid time off and ex…Read More

  10. Young Women Who Exercise Have Less Heart Disease in Later Life

    Younger women who exercise just 2 ½ hours per week may cut their risk for heart disease by up to 25 percent. The choices they make in the first half of their lives determine their well-being and health in the second half, according to a study from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. High…Read More