1. Healthier Employees Are Socially Connected

    The Mayo Clinic has advised that people with strong social connections are generally healthier. They have reduced risk of depression, high blood pressure and being over weight. This is important because healthier employees have so many benefits, including having higher work performance, fewer sick d…Read More

  2. Sit Less. Move More!

    Couch potatoes, take note: A new study warns older adults that excessive sitting, especially while watching TV, poses a significant health hazard. Researchers studied the activity patterns of 134,000 adults, aged 50 to 71. Watching more than five hours of TV daily and getting three or fewer hours of…Read More

  3. How to Reduce Physician Burnout

    Along with nurses, physician burnout is a growing problem. The Mayo Clinic offers these nine inexpensive strategies to improve physician engagement and reduce burnout: Admit there is a problem and then assess it. Identify physician leaders: Look for physicians who have the ability to listen, engag…Read More

  4. 29% of HealthCare Professionals Plan to Change Jobs Next Year

    Healthcare salaries are on the rise, but providers are falling short in motivating employees to stay at their jobs; 29 percent of healthcare professionals expect to change employers in the next year.  The Health eCareers' annual Healthcare Salary Guide surveyed 19,754 healthcare professionals in Ja…Read More

  5. Get Moving At Work

    If your head starts to nod mid-afternoon and you could really use a nap or a candy bar, you’re not alone. The afternoon slump is real; it’s your body's response to a drop in your blood-sugar as well as its natural circadian rhythm. In fact, one of our strongest urges to sleep comes between 1 p.m…Read More

  6. Healthy Caregivers = Better Care

    The well-being of patients' informal caregivers is associated with perceived quality of care among patients with cancer, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Perceived quality of care is becoming an increasingly important metric of patient satisfaction and reimbursemen…Read More

  7. Job Dissatisfaction Affects Mental Health

    20 and 30-year-olds who are generally unhappy with their jobs may experience some health backlash by the time they reach their 40s, new research suggests. Researchers from The Ohio State University found that happiness on the job (or lack thereof) appears to have the biggest impact on midlife mental…Read More

  8. Save Money: Exercise

    Staying fit not only adds years to your life, but dollars to your wallet, says a new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Researchers reviewed data from a survey of some 26,000 Americans over the age of 18 and found that people who said they met the recommended criteria …Read More

  9. Exercise Slows Mental Decline

    A long-term study of twins showed that physical activity may reduce the risk of cognitive decline later in life. Following up with more than 3,000 twins 25 years after they provided information on their exercise habits shows physical activity in midlife leads to better cognition later in life, repor…Read More

  10. It Costs More to Replace Than to Retain

    You’ve heard it over and over: It’s more expensive to replace an employee than to retain one. A 2015 study, “The impact of human resource practices on employee retention in the telecom sector,” published in the International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, reports that costs assoc…Read More